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Eccles School Celebrates Historical Ties to Federal Reserve Bank by Hosting University Symposium

As the U.S. economy continues to improve and monetary policy moves toward normalization, the David Eccles School of Business is pleased to partner with the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco to host a simulation of the Federal Open Market Committee meeting. The event involves Eccles School students in the role of the committee members, including Reserve Bank Presidents, Federal Reserve Board Governors, and Chair Janet Yellen. Students will hear a presentation on the U.S. economy, discuss economic conditions around the country, and then vote to determine the level of the Fed’s key interest rate and the stance of monetary policy as they work to meet the Fed’s dual mandate of full employment and price stability.

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A path to brighter images and more efficient LCD displays

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U Mathematician Named to Explorers Club

University of Utah professor Ken Golden – dubbed the “Indiana Jones of mathematics” – has been selected as a fellow of the Explorers Club, an elite group that also has included astronaut Neil Armstrong, test pilot Chuck Yeager and Mount Everest conqueror Sir Edmund Hillary. Read More

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Viruses Impaired If Their Targets Have Diverse Genes

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Why Lizards Have Bird Breath

Whether birds are breathing in or out, air flows in a one-directional loop through their lungs. This pattern was unexpected and for decades, biologists assumed it was unique to birds, a special adaptation driven by the intense energy demands of flight. Read More