Jared Rutter HCI (2)

Seminal Discoveries in Metabolism Earn Biochemist Jared Rutter, Ph.D., HHMI Investigator Appointment

A University of Utah biochemist whose research has significantly expanded the understanding of human metabolism–chemical processes that synthesize and break down the building blocks of cells–and its relation to disease has received a highly prized honor in the world of science: selection as an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI).
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from the U
Dan Hixson/University of Utah College of Engineering

Computing at the speed of light

Utah engineers have developed an ultracompact beamsplitter — the smallest on record — for dividing light waves into two separate channels of information. The device brings researchers closer to producing silicon photonic chips that compute and shuttle data with light instead of electrons. Read More

Sean Brennan, University of Washington

New tool to save salmon: isotope tracking

May 15, 2015 – Salmon carry a strontium chemical signature in their “ear bones” that lets scientists identify specific streams where the fish hatched and lived before they were caught at sea. The new tool may help pinpoint critical habitats for fish threatened by climate change, industrial development and overfishing. “Using this method, we can Read More

Gehl SMAP edit

Beyond Facebook: The Social Media Alternatives Project

May 14, 2015 – There’s more to social networking than Facebook, Google+, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram. That’s what Robert W. Gehl, assistant professor of communication at the University of Utah, is finding as he scours the Internet for what he calls “alternative social media” sites and services built as a critical response to corporate social Read More

William H. Majoros [CC BY-SA 3.0] via Wikimedia Commons

Massive southern invasions by northern birds linked to climate shifts

Scientists have pinpointed the climate pattern that likely sets the stage for boreal bird irruptions in which vast numbers of northern birds migrate far south of their usual winter range. The discovery could make it possible to predict the events more than a year in advance. Read More