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University of Utah’s New Phevor Software Identifies Disease-Causing Gene Mutations in Three Undiagnosed Children

A computational tool developed at the University of Utah (U of U) has successfully identified diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases, U of U researchers and their colleagues report in a new study in The American Journal of Human Genetics. The software, Phevor (Phenotype Driven Variant Ontological Re-ranking tool), identifies undiagnosed illnesses and unknown gene mutations by analyzing the exomes, or areas of DNA where proteins that code for genes are made, in individual patients and small families. Read More

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At Annual EAE Fest, Games Go Mobile

The University of Utah Entertainment Arts and Engineering Program (EAE) kicks off its three-day annual EAE Fest on Wednesday, April 23. This year, four PlayStation Vita Games, two published PC Games and one game on Ouya and Steam Greenlight will be demonstrated alongside medical games and apps developed by students and faculty from the EAE program. Additional events will feature student animation and machinima, which are short films made using videogames. Read More

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Community Solar Comes to Campus

The University of Utah is the first university in the country to sponsor a community solar program. The program offers U community members the opportunity to purchase discounted rooftop solar panels and installation for their homes. Read More

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More, Bigger Wildfires Burning Western U.S.

Wildfires across the western United States have been getting bigger and more frequent over the last 30 years – a trend that could continue as climate change causes temperatures to rise and drought to become more severe in the coming decades, according to new research. Read More

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Warm U.S. West, Cold East: A 4,000-Year Pattern

Last winter’s curvy jet stream pattern brought mild temperatures to western North America and harsh cold to the East. A University of Utah-led study shows that pattern became more pronounced 4,000 years ago, and suggests it may worsen as Earth’s climate warms. Read More