Science & Technology

U law professor: Change rules of CRISPR patents to broaden possibilities of future scientific breakthroughs

February 16, 2017

New research published by University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law Associate Professor Jorge Contreras in the journal Science today proposes that universities currently holding CRISPR patents open their licenses to broader segments of the biopharma industry — a change that could potentially lead to important discoveries for human health and medicine. “Because the potential for CRISPR as the […]


Scientists Discover How the Cells in Skin and Organ Linings Maintain Constant cell numbers

February 16, 2017

Research published today in Nature from scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah shows how epithelial cells – such as skin cells – naturally turn over, maintaining constant numbers between cell division and cell death. In addition to skin, epithelial cells comprise skin-like linings that coat internal organs, giving organs a […]


Intensive Blood Pressure Control Could Prevent 100,000 Deaths Each Year

February 13, 2017

Researchers have projected that aggressively lowering blood pressure could help prevent more than 100,000 deaths in the U.S. each year. “The public health impact of adopting intensive treatment in the right patients is enormous,” says Adam Bress, University of Utah assistant professor of population health sciences. Bress and his fellow experts from institutions across the country built […]


“Field patterns” as a new mathematical object

February 13, 2017

University of Utah mathematicians propose a theoretical framework to understand how waves and other disturbances move through materials in conditions that vary in both space and time. The theory, called “field patterns,” published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society A. Field patterns are characteristic patterns of how disturbances react to changing conditions. Because field […]


Consortium for Dark Sky Studies

February 10, 2017

The University of Utah has awarded formal recognition to the Consortium for Dark Sky Studies (CDSS), the first academic center in the world dedicated to discovering, developing, communicating and applying knowledge pertaining to the quality of the night skies. The CDSS is an interdisciplinary, multi-institutional research group based in the College of Architecture and Planning […]


Flat-footed fighters

February 8, 2017

Walking on our heels, a feature that separates great apes, including humans, from other primates, confers advantages in fighting, according to a new University of Utah study published Feb. 15 in Biology Open. Although moving from the balls of the feet is important for quickness, standing with heels planted allows more swinging force, according to study […]


Routinely Prescribed Antibiotic May Not Be Best for Treating Severe C. diff Infections

February 6, 2017

Over the past two decades there has been a sharp rise in the number and severity of infections caused by the bacteria Clostridium difficile, often shortened to C. diff, now the most common hospital acquired infection in the United States. But a new study suggests that the most routinely prescribed antibiotic is not the best treatment for […]


Genomes in flux

February 6, 2017

SALT LAKE CITY – Evolution is often thought of as a gradual remodeling of the genome, the genetic blueprints for building an organism. In some instances it might be more appropriate to call it an overhaul. Over the past 100 million years, the human lineage has lost one-fifth of its DNA, while an even greater […]


U, The V(i)llage inspiring future black engineers and scientists

February 3, 2017

The University of Utah’s STEM Outreach Committee, Office of Engagement and The V(i)llage are partnering to inspire future black engineers and scientists by hosting a STEM U college experience for middle and high school students on Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017. Student participants are members in The V(i)llage, a comprehensive leadership bridge program for self-identifying African, […]


Flipping the switch on ammonia production

February 3, 2017

Nearly a century ago, German chemist Fritz Haber won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for a process to generate ammonia from hydrogen and nitrogen gases. The process, still in use today, ushered in a revolution in agriculture, but now consumes around one percent of the world’s energy to achieve the high pressures and temperatures that […]