Sex, lice and videotape

Access more multimedia files here.

A few years ago, Scott Villa of Emory University had a problem. Then a graduate student at the University of Utah, he was stumped with an issue never addressed in school: How does one film lice having sex?

Villa and University of Utah biologists had demonstrated real-time adaptation in their lab that triggered reproductive isolation in just four years, mimicking millions of years of evolution. They began … Read more

U appoints new director of University Neighborhood Partners

University of Utah President Ruth Watkins has appointed Jennifer Mayer-Glenn as the new director of University Neighborhood Partners and special assistant to the president for campus-community partnerships.

Mayer-Glenn will assume the position on July 1, 2019. She follows Sarah Munro, who has served as director of University Neighborhood Partners (UNP) since 2015 and has been deeply engaged with the program for more than a decade.

“Jennifer’s commitment to building genuine, sustainable partnerships, … Read more

U launches master’s degree specifically for entrepreneurs

The David Eccles School of Business at the University of Utah is taking its top 10 ranked program for entrepreneurship to new heights with a master’s degree designed for serious entrepreneurs.

The degree is called the Master of Business Creation (MBC), and it’s the first of its kind.

Applicants must be full-time entrepreneurs who want to create, launch and scale a new business, who want more than the 9-to-5 job, who have … Read more

100 years of The Provo Herald digitized

The University of Utah’s J. Willard Marriott Library has digitized 100 years of editions of The Provo Herald—known today as the Daily Herald—and made the archive available online and free to the public.

Starting with 1909 and ending with 2009, the project, which is part of the Utah Digital Newspapers online repository, is one of the largest digitization efforts completed by the Marriott Library to date.

Those with Utah County roots will surely … Read more

A forest “glow” reveals awakening from hibernation

Winters in the northern hemisphere are brutal. The harsh conditions drive some species to hibernate; bears reduce their metabolic state to conserve energy until spring. Forests also endure winter by conserving energy; they shut down photosynthesis, the process by which a green pigment called chlorophyll captures sunlight and carbon dioxide (CO2) to produce the chemical energy that fuels the plants. The total production of chemical energy resulting from photosynthesis is … Read more

Aftershocks of 1959 earthquake rocked Yellowstone in 2017-18

On Aug. 17, 1959, back when Dwight D. Eisenhower was president, the U.S. had yet to send a human to space and the nation’s flag sported 49 stars, Yellowstone National Park shook violently for about 30 seconds. The shock was strong enough to drop the ground a full 20 feet in some places. It toppled the dining room fireplace in the Old Faithful Inn. Groundwater swelled up and down in … Read more

How Earth’s mantle is like a Jackson Pollock painting

In countless grade-school science textbooks, the Earth’s mantle is a yellow-to-orange gradient, a nebulously defined layer between the crust and the core.

To geologists, the mantle is so much more than that. It’s a region that lives somewhere between the cold of the crust and the bright heat of the core. It’s where the ocean floor is born and where tectonic plates die.

A new paper published today in Nature Geoscience paints … Read more